(in)visibles

Category: citas (page 1 of 2)

Carl Sagan, a book.

A book is made from a tree. It is an assemblage of flat, flexible parts (still called “leaves”) imprinted with dark pigmented squiggles. One glance at it and you hear the voice of another person, perhaps someone dead for thousands of years. Across the millennia, the author is speaking, clearly and silently, inside your head, directly to you. Writing is perhaps the greatest of human inventions, binding together people, citizens of distant epochs, who never knew one another. Books break the shackles of time, proof that humans can work magic.

Carl Sagan.

 

For fun

`I think that it’s extraordinarily important that we in computer science keep fun in computing. When it started out, it was an awful lot of fun. Of course, the paying customers got shafted every now and then, and after a while we began to take their complaints seriously. We began to feel as if we really were responsible for the successful, error-free perfect use of these machines. I don’t think we are. I think we’re responsible for stretching them, setting them off in new directions, and keeping fun in the house. I hope the field of computer science never loses its sense of fun. Above all, I hope we don’t become missionaries. Don’t feel as if you’re Bible salesmen. The world has too many of those already. What you know about computing other people will learn. Don’t feel as if the key to successful computing is only in your hands. What’s in your hands, I think and hope, is intelligence: the ability to see the machine as more than when you were first led up to it, that you can make it more.

 

Alan J. Perlis (April 1, 1922-February 7, 1990)

The only people for me

 

Jack Kerouac Making a  Face

“The only people for me are the mad ones,
the ones who are mad to live,
mad to talk,
mad to be saved,
desirous of everything at the same time,
the ones who never yawn or say a commonplace thing,
but burn,
burn,
burn,
like fabulous yellow roman candles exploding like spiders across the stars
and in the middle you see the blue centerlight pop
and everybody goes “Awww!”

~Jack Kerouac

 

The Passionate Programmer

Fulfillment and happiness don’t (often) come by chance. They require thought, intention, action, and a willingness to change course when you’ve made mistakes…

 

It might be a technology or business domain that gets you excited. Or, on the other hand, it might be a specific technology or business domain that drags you down. Or a type of organization. Maybe you’re meant for small teams or big teams. Or rigid processes. Or agile processes. Whatever the mix, take some time to find yours. You can fake it for a while, but a lack of passion will catch up with you and your work.

 

Del Passionate Programmer, uno lo de los libros indispensables si te gusta tu profesión.

Hay belleza en la simplicidad

This is from the help pages to Tiny Wings (iTunes Store link) by Andreas Illiger.

That’s all you need to know, right there:

  • Goal: flight.
  • Conflict: this will be difficult because your wings are tiny.
  • Game mechanic: perhaps you can use the many beautiful hills to help.

And then there’s an illustration to piece all the pieces together and explain what you’re going to do.

The whole game is explained in two sentences; two sentences that manage to contain pathos, hope, a goal, and hints at the gameplay mechanic for achieving that goal.

Visto aqui, via logicola

 

Complex and inteligent behavior

Simple, clear purpose and principles give rise to complex and intelligent behavior. Complex rules and regulations give rise to simple and stupid behavior

Dee Hock, founder of Visa.

La documentación no tiene por que ser aburrida

a ØMQ socket is what you get when you take a normal TCP socket, inject it with a mix of radioactive isotopes stolen from a secret Soviet atomic research project, bombard it with 1950-era cosmic rays, and put it into the hands of a drug-addled comic book author with a badly-disguised fetish for bulging muscles clad in spandex.

De la documentación de zeromq, el sistema de mensajes que usa mongrel2

We build castles in the air, from air…

Una de las citas que mas me gustan para explicar como funciona el desarrollo de software de Frederick Brooks:

“The programmer, like the poet, works only slightly removed from pure thought-stuff.

“He builds castles in the air, from air, creating by exertion of the imagination. Few media of creation are so flexible, so easy to polish and rework, so readily capable of realizing grand conceptual structures.

“Yet the program construct, unlike the poet’s words, is real in the sense that it moves and works, producing visible outputs separate from the construct itself. It prints results, draws pictures, produces sounds, moves arms.

“The magic of myth and legend has come true in our time. One types the correct incantation on a keyboard, and a display screen comes to life, showing things that never were nor could be. …

“The computer resembles the magic of legend in this respect, too. If one character, one pause, of the incantation is not strictly in proper form, the magic doesn’t work. Human beings are not accustomed to being perfect, an few areas of human activity demand it.

“Adjusting to the requirement for perfection is, I think, the most difficult part of learning to program.”

From The Mythical Man-Month: Essays on Software Engineering, Anniversary Edition

the way you think

A language that doesn’t affect the way you think about programming is not worth knowing — Alan Perlis

La idea.

La idea, por su naturaleza misma, necesita ser comunicada: escrita,
explicada, realizada. Como la hierba, la idea busca la luz, ama las
multitudes, las cruzas la enriqueces, crece más vigorosa cuando se la pisa.

Ursula K. LeGuin, “Los desposeídos”

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